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Ars Brevis: The Votive Mass of the Blessed Virgin Mary (4 of 7)

Updated: Dec 1, 2023

The Ars Brevis instructs the reader to perform votive masses as part of the magical experiment(s). There are two versions of the Ars Brevis, which describe what and how the magical experiment(s) are conducted. In one version, there is an understanding that there may only be a single magical experiment which is related to a single magical figure which takes place over the course of one week. The second version indicates that there may be up to four magical experiments and that the text presents the basic template of any one of these experiments which occurs over the course of four days. The number and frequency of votive masses depends upon which version is followed. The ritual procedures of the Ars Brevis is detailed in my book, Ars Notoria: The Notory Art of Solomon (Rochester, VT: Inner Traditions, 2023).


The votive Mass of the Blessed Virgin Mary, also called the Mass of the Immaculate Heart of the Blessed Virgin Mary, is traditionally performed on the Saturday after the second Sunday after Pentecost. As a votive mass, however, it can be performed on any day of the week. Now there are several masses dedicated to the Virgin Mary, however, the Ars Brevis identifies it by its Gospel reading of Luke 2:41-51. According to one version of the Ars Brevis, the votive Mass of the Blessed Virgin Mary is to be performed on the fourth and final day of the operation. According to another version of the Ars Brevis, the same votive mass is to be performed on Wednesday.


As far as I can tell, the votive Mass of the Blessed Virgin Mary, as the Ars Brevis identifies it, is not found in the 1962 Roman Catholic Daily Missal. The 1962 edition says there is only one votive mass dedicated to the Virgin Mary, and it is called Missae de S. Maria in Sabbato ("Mass of Saint Mary on the Sabbath"). This is not the same votive mass as described by the Ars Brevis as its Gospel reading is from Luke 1:26-38. For the votive Mass of the Blessed Virgin Mary as described by the Ars Brevis, the reader is directed to the following link:


This blog entry is intended to supplement the work published in my book, and so the reader is directed to it for a proper introduction and English translation of the Ars Brevis.


This blog entry's image of the Virgin Mary and child is from the British Library, Additional 37049, f. 25v, 15th century.


[This article is an expansion upon a passage from my Ars Notoria: The Notory Art of Solomon (Inner Traditions, 2023).]


This digital edition by Matthias Castle, Copyright 2023. All rights reserved. Please do not copy this text to your website, or for any purpose other than private use.


Ars Notoria: The Notory Art of Solomon translated by Matthias Castle, published by Inner Traditions International and Bear & Company, © 2023. All rights reserved. http://www.Innertraditions.com Reprinted with permission of publisher.

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